An illustration depicting a hand reaching into a digital browser window and physical sphere.
An illustration depicting a hand reaching into a digital browser window and physical sphere.

When it comes to prototyping physical interactions with visual interfaces, Arduino and Processing are probably one of the first things that come to mind. But so is how tedious it can be to handle data streams between Arduino and Processing or how adventurous it is to mock up GUIs in Processing.

The year is 2021, and today we can leverage modern web technologies to rapid prototype frontends that respond to our Arduino sensors. …


An illustration of a website with website content piling up.
An illustration of a website with website content piling up.

Your design portfolio is never finished. At best, it has caught up to your recent projects and is a snapshot of your current state as a designer, but in most cases it is dragging behind you, hesitantly showcasing projects you did six months ago.

Keeping your portfolio up to date is a challenge. New projects are lining up and life is happening, and in between it’s hard to find the time and energy to dust off ‘old’ projects and formulate them into articles or case studies. …


Your portfolio shouldn’t be proof that you’ve been doing something for the past few years. Instead, your portfolio should be a showcase of your best work. It should give a glimpse into how you do your best work and what you’re passionate about. This means that the projects you decide to include in your portfolio tell a lot about you as a designer — if you want or not.

Which projects you should or should not include in your portfolio is something I’ve been struggling with myself and struggle with to this day, so I thought I’d take this opportunity…


An illustration of a typewriter with a particular paragraph colored.
An illustration of a typewriter with a particular paragraph colored.

Building a portfolio from scratch can be a daunting task. You’re staring at a blank canvas and the first brush stroke is always the most difficult one to make. Maybe you look at portfolios of your colleagues for inspiration or you look at portfolio themes which you could use. But it’s a trap. It’s easy to get caught up in all the million ways your portfolio could look like or the thousand tools you could use to build your folio — but the design of your portfolio shouldn’t matter at the beginning.

The purpose of your portfolio design is to…


Image credits: Sergey Zolkin @ Unsplash

Design portfolios live through their content. Or at least they should. But while a portfolio’s content is one thing, how that content is wrapped and delivered is another. Nowadays, PDF and website portfolios are the most common way to do exactly that. But when it comes to which is the better choice, opinions still differ. It’s time to put this discussion to rest and see, why your next portfolio probably shouldn’t be a PDF.

Building a PDF portfolio isn’t inherently wrong. But depending on what kind of design you practice, it’s probably not great either. Let’s take a look at…

Alexander Widua

MFA Interaction Design @ Umeå Institute of Design

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